Caffeine Alleviates Hypoxia

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This topic contains 3 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Anonymous 5 years, 6 months ago.

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  • #3518

    Anonymous

    I've been reading the site and found it interesting that caffeine is strongly correlated with the success of DCA treatment. It may be relevant that hypoxia induces the release of adenosine, which has a variety of tumor-promoting effects, and caffeine is a well-known antagonist of the adenosine A2a receptor (A2aAR).

     

    For example, adenosine promotes tumor progression by inducing the accumulation of HIF-1alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and interleukin-8 (IL-8) expression in hypoxic cancer cells, and caffeine blocks this effect. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17488804)

    Also, adenosine prevents T cells from successfully attacking tumor cells, and caffeine can block this as well. (http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/70/6/2245.short)

    Hypoxia seems to be a concern with DCA therapy, and it's possible that caffeine's effectiveness is due to directly mitigating the effects of hypoxia.

    #4312

    Anonymous

    Excellent contribution above.  Add to this the  poly(adenosine diphosphate [ADP]–ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibiting activity of caffeine and paraxanthine and you have further possible explanation of the role of xanthines as anti-cancer agents and possibly synergistic with DCA.  The problem is that no one has done a human study of DCA with or without a measured amount of caffeine  and/or caffeine metabolites or other polyphenols like  chlorogenic acid (CHA)(caffeoylquinic acid) that are in coffee, tea and colas. 

    Stephen B. Strum, MD, FACP

    #4313

    Anonymous

    Excellent contribution above.  Add to this the  poly(adenosine diphosphate [ADP]–ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibiting activity of caffeine and paraxanthine and you have further possible explanation of the role of xanthines as anti-cancer agents and possibly synergistic with DCA.  The problem is that no one has done a human study of DCA with or without a measured amount of caffeine  and/or caffeine metabolites or other polyphenols like  chlorogenic acid (CHA)(caffeoylquinic acid) that are in coffee, tea and colas. 

    Stephen B. Strum, MD, FACP

    #4314

    Anonymous

    Sorry for duplication.  For whatever reasons, clicking on "submit" seems to take very long and the second click seems to not only result in the submission but in duplication. 

    Stephen Strum

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