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Sandramoderator
Member since Feb-27-07
1178 posts
May-12-10, 11:39 AM (PST)
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"U of A Website Update"
 
DCA Research Team publishes results of Clinical Trials
May 12, 2010


Edmonton, AB - Medical Researchers at the University of Alberta reported today evidence that the orphan generic drug Dichloroacetate (DCA) may hold promise as potential therapy for perhaps the deadliest of all human cancers: a form of brain cancer called glioblastoma. The report is published at the journal Science Translational Medicine, a journal of the American Association of the Advancement of Science; it appears today at the journal's web site http://www.sciencemag.org/

In 2007 the U of A team led by Dr Michelakis, published evidence that DCA reverses cancer growth in non-human models and test tubes. The team showed then that DCA achieves these antitumor effects by altering the metabolism of cancer. By altering the way cancer handles its nutrient fuels, specifically the sugars, DCA was able to take away cancer's most important strength, the resistance to death. Since then, several independent groups across the world have confirmed the Alberta team's findings. In December 2009, the editors of "Science" predicted that cancer metabolism is one of only 5 areas across all scientific disciplines, to "watch for major breakthroughs" in 2010.

The U of A team set out to show that the way that DCA works in actual patients is the same with the way it works in the lab. In addition, researchers wanted to show whether DCA is safe and possibly effective in very sick patients with brain cancer.

By extracting glioblastomas from 49 patients over a period of 2 years and studying them within minutes of removal in the operating room, the team showed that tumors respond to DCA by changing their metabolism. Then, the team treated 5 patients with advanced glioblastoma and secured tumor tissues before and after the DCA therapy. By comparing the two, the team showed that DCA works in these tumors exactly as was predicted by test tube experiments. This is very important because often the results in non-human models tested in the lab do not agree with the results in patients. In addition, the team showed that DCA has anti-cancer effects by altering the metabolism of glioblastoma cancer stem cells, the cells thought responsible for the recurrences of cancer.

In the 5 patients tested, the drug took 3 months to reach blood levels high enough to alter the tumor's metabolism. At those levels, there were no significant adverse effects. However, at some of the higher doses tested, DCA caused nerve malfunction, i.e. numbing of toes and fingers. Importantly, in some patients there was also evidence for clinical benefit, with the tumors either regressing in size or not growing further during the 18 month study.

No conclusions can be made on whether the drug is safe or effective in patients with this form of brain cancer, due to the limited number of patients tested by the study's leads Drs Michelakis and Petruk. Researchers emphasize that use of DCA by patients or physicians, supplied from for-profit sources or without close clinical observation by experienced medical teams in the setting of research trials, is not only inappropriate but may also be dangerous. The U of A results are encouraging and support the need for larger clinical trials with DCA. This work is also one of the first in humans to support the emerging idea that altering the metabolism of tumors is a new direction in the treatment of cancer, Michelakis and Petruk said.

The research team hopes to secure additional funding to continue the ongoing trials with DCA at the University of Alberta. Further studies would include more patients with brain cancer, and test the combination of DCA and standard chemotherapies, eventually including patients from other academic health sciences centres.

One of the intriguing features of this work was that it was funded largely by public donations, including philanthropic foundations and individuals. In addition, it received support by Alberta public institutions, both the University of Alberta and Alberta Health Sciences. The multidisciplinary team that performed this challenging translational research included members of the Departments of Medicine, Diagnostic Imaging and Biomedical Engineering, Oncology and Neurosurgery. Clinicians, scientists, nurses and graduate students worked together for 2 years and express their gratitude to the people of Alberta, philanthropists, the patients and their families.

http://www.dca.med.ualberta.ca/Home/Updates/2010-05-12_Update.cfm


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U of A Website Update [View All], Sandramoderator, 11:39 AM, May-12-10, (0)  
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Sandramoderator
Member since Feb-27-07
1178 posts
May-12-10, 05:27 PM (PST)
Click to EMail Sandra Click to send private message to Sandra Click to view user profileClick to add this user to your buddy list  
1. "RE: U of A Website Update"
In response to message #0
 
Interesting none of the big 'cancer charities' have stepped up to fund this research. They're all fronts for Big Pharma. People should stop 'running for the cure' and set up their own bank accounts for when they get cancer. Eating organic food and taking supplements isn't cheap, nor is it covered by 'health insurance'.
That's my rant for today.

Here is the abstract of Michelakis' paper:

Solid tumors, including the aggressive primary brain cancer glioblastoma multiforme, develop resistance to cell death, in part as a result of a switch from mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation to cytoplasmic glycolysis. This metabolic remodeling is accompanied by mitochondrial hyperpolarization. We tested whether the small-molecule and orphan drug dichloroacetate (DCA) can reverse this cancer-specific metabolic and mitochondrial remodeling in glioblastoma. Freshly isolated glioblastomas from 49 patients showed mitochondrial hyperpolarization, which was rapidly reversed by DCA. In a separate experiment with five patients who had glioblastoma, we prospectively secured baseline and serial tumor tissue, developed patient-specific cell lines of glioblastoma and putative glioblastoma stem cells (CD133+, nestin+ cells), and treated each patient with oral DCA for up to 15 months. DCA depolarized mitochondria, increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, and induced apoptosis in GBM cells, as well as in putative GBM stem cells, both in vitro and in vivo. DCA therapy also inhibited the hypoxia-inducible factor–1α, promoted p53 activation, and suppressed angiogenesis both in vivo and in vitro. The dose-limiting toxicity was a dose-dependent, reversible peripheral neuropathy, and there was no hematologic, hepatic, renal, or cardiac toxicity. Indications of clinical efficacy were present at a dose that did not cause peripheral neuropathy and at serum concentrations of DCA sufficient to inhibit the target enzyme of DCA, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase II, which was highly expressed in all glioblastomas. Metabolic modulation may be a viable therapeutic approach in the treatment of glioblastoma.

http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/2/31/31ra34.abstract


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Sandramoderator
Member since Feb-27-07
1178 posts
May-12-10, 10:48 PM (PST)
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2. "RE: U of A Website Update"
In response to message #1
 
Just an aside - I don't want to go off topic here, but I try not to make statements without backing up what I say with a reference. Here is a site exposing the conflicts of interest between cancer charities and pharma companies.

http://www.preventcancer.com/losing/acs/wealthiest_links.htm


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incomingduck
Member since May-4-07
59 posts
May-12-10, 10:50 PM (PST)
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3. "RE: U of A Website Update"
In response to message #1
 
   Major media outlets are now picking up on the story regarding the latest research. A 2-word search of Google News (the 2 words are "dca" and "cancer") is now showing a lot of hits.

DCA is the real deal and knowledge of this fact may finally be sinking in.

Too bad it has taken this long. Shame on the naysayers and shame on those who make DCA impossible to obtain in the USA.


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robmx
Member since May-25-09
63 posts
May-13-10, 11:43 AM (PST)
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4. "RE: U of A Website Update"
In response to message #3
 
   What happens to the four people who lived 18 months on DCA at the end of this study? Are they taken off DCA and left to die?


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Sandramoderator
Member since Feb-27-07
1178 posts
May-23-10, 03:25 PM (PST)
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5. "RE: U of A Website Update"
In response to message #1
 
I LOVED THIS ARTICLE!!! YES! YES!! YES!!!! MAKES ME WANT TO MARCH IN THE STREETS!!!

Channel the money


CALGARY HERALD MAY 23, 2010


Re: "Trial cancer drug shrinks tumours," May 13.

Doctors in northern Alberta have used dichloroacetate (DCA) to shrink brain tumours in people with a limited life expectancy. When I read that the patients were told that, because DCA is a common chemical and can't be patented; therefore drug companies would not provide funding to bring the drug through the extensive clinical trials needed to make it a viable treatment, I wondered why, when the public raises so much money for cancer research, some of this money isn't used for clinical trials into inexpensive, effective and less invasive treatments. Why don't we have a fund specially designated for this? I would be far more willing to donate money to such a cause. Why, too, do governments not contribute funds to such a cause? They would save so many health-care dollars if these safe, effective and inexpensive treatments could be used successfully. Instead, we raise billions for cancer research and get more expensive, often ineffective, and invasive treatments that destroy the immune system. Congratulations to the people of northern Alberta who raised money to go ahead with the research. And congratulations to the doctors who were willing to work in a new direction to cure people of cancer.

Mary Martens, Calgary

© Copyright (c) The Calgary Herald


Read more: http://www.calgaryherald.com/health/Channel+money/3062631/story.html#ixzz0onlsiYz3


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joeyooser
Member since Feb-5-10
16 posts
May-26-10, 03:41 PM (PST)
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6. "RE: U of A Website Update"
In response to message #5
 
   I'm glad they finally posted some more positive news. I am a Stage III cancer patient and I am taking DCA without any known cancer being present. Have no idea if I should keep taking it or not.

But to all the conspiracists who are posting in this thread, DCA is not a cure-all and obviously isn't totally effective, judging by how many people are dying over in the testimonials board. I think it's just as important to keep the pro-DCA hype in check. In fact, all the recent threads in the testimonials board are reports of deaths while taking DCA. Not too encouraging there, IMHO.


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